The Consumption Series – Books I’ve been reading!

Hello Internet.

It’s been a while since I stroked the keys on my keyboard while being at this editor window. Looking back, the last *proper* post that I published in here was way back in November of the dumpster fire year of 2016 (excluding the guest post by my friend).

So, essentially, I haven’t posted a single. frickin’. post. in 2017. That’s not a streak to be proud of.

So, to break exactly that, I’m starting with this 3 part “consumption” series, to share with you guys the stuff I’ve been consuming. And I’ll be exclusively focusing on books this post.


 

Books are pretty neat!

I can’t quite comprehend the ‘Aha!’ moment that Gutenberg must’ve experienced when he finally figured out a way to mass produce Bibles cheaply. Books are super-dense chunks of knowledge neatly stacked together in the form to form leaves of pages, which are then elegantly bound, with a hardcover (or a soft one) guarding the contents.

Well, that’s how books used to be; Now we have things like e-readers, e-book apps for smartphones and of course, audio-books. All of these new technologies are massively redrawing the very image of a “book”.

Now that I’ve given my brief introduction about books, let’s jump right in to the books I’ve been reading these past 6 months.

‘Demon Haunted World’, by Carl Sagan

For the last 500 or so years, starting with the path-breaking Copernican heliocentrism, Science has forged us a new path in understanding the insanely complex Universe we inhabit. The Scientific-method probably is right up there; next to the invention of wheel and the discovery of fire, in the hall of Human milestones.

In the Demon Haunted World, Carl Sagan beautifully explains the essence of Science and the Scientific-method. He talks about the various human biases and logical fallacies. He warns us about how we should be ever careful about people promising us quick fixes/solutions to all of the issues we face. He gently describes to us about how the world actually is, COMPLEX.

He uses the alluring examples of ‘Alien Abduction’, ‘Flying saucers’ and various other urban legends to entice us towards thinking skeptically and using some aspects of the Scientific-method to bolster and refine our modes of thinking, in an era of information overload, misinformation and ever-present propaganda.

Overall, this book is a fascinating read and will certainly help you bump up your reasoning skills and propel you toward asking question and be more curious in general.

And, Sagan’s exceptional ability to communicate super complex ideas makes it easy for even a layman to understand.

4.5/5

P.S. I absolutely believe this is what most of us should be reading right now, especially after the shit-storm of misinformation that’s been trickling out of the White House, MSM, and other news sources. This book is a good anti-dote to the post-truth world (fake news, propaganda, misinformation, and disinformation etc.) we currently inhabit.

 

‘Einstein’, by Walter Isaacson

There’s a certain charm to biographies. It’s quite revealing to read about a person’s life in great depth, in learning about how some small and perhaps ‘insignificant’ decisions could push them toward a path of self-discovery.

And, Walter Isaacson is really good at this. He has the biographies of two other American greats under his belt, that of Benjamin Franklin and Steve Jobs.

‘Einstein’ is a testament to Isaacson’s biographical abilities. He vividly documents Einstein’s life, from his infancy, through his early years in education, his fondness for observing the surroundings, his love for Mathematics and Physics, his foray into the academic realm, his groundbreaking papers in Physics (which would radically change the way Physicists dealt with time and space), and through his escape from persecution in Nazi Germany, his escape to the United States, his involvement in the Manhattan Project ultimately resulting in the Trinity test (world’s first detonation of a fission bomb a.k.a Nuke), his thoughtful insights into the post war rivalry between the United States and the USSR, his later work in Physics and his ultimate death, complete with a special section on the preservation of Einstein’s brain.

Overall, this was a very gripping read. Isaacson deserves much praise for the way he documents Einstein’s entire life, particularly the way he brings about contrast between the various aspects of the life of one of the smartest people to have ever walked on the face of the planet.

This book helped me appreciate all of the little things we take for granted in our mundane everyday lives, as the people we consider super smart are merely more observational and curious than the average Joe (aside from a lifetime of dedication to the subject in question, *totally not trying to make it look easy*).

5/5

 

‘The Glass Cage’, by Nick Carr

My second Nicholas Carr book, ‘Glass Cage: Automation and Us’ tackles one of the most biggest societal issue of this century — what the rise of automation means for global employment, economy and Capitalistic society as a whole.

Carr takes us back to the 18th/19th centuries and accustoms us with the fact that this debate is not something that just popped out from the dot-com bubble era, but rather a large section of society’s animosity toward Automation is something that’s been a common theme since the dawn of the industrial revolution.

Carr uses numerous examples from various chunks of recent history to illustrate his point that, although automation might potentially be beneficial in the short term, it causes tremendous societal and political upheaval over the course of the many decades, and impacts of a certain kind of technology can only be judged through the hindsight lens.

His takes on factory robots, self-driving cars and A.I. get quite interesting at times, though he does come across as a postmodern Luddite more often than not. Also, some parts of the book feel forcefully stretchy and borderline unnecessary.

Overall, this book gave me a good perspective on the state of automation globally and a glimpse into the kind of things we could expect as automation becomes even more mainstream by the middle of this century.

3/5

P.S. You can check out my review of Nick Carr’s first book, here.


 

So as you can probably guess, the past one half of a year has been pretty busy for me. Aside from feeding my synapses with the contents from these 3 books, I also worked a lot on stabilizing my academic boat, apart from dealing with personal issues that kept popping up. 6 months has been the longest I’ve ever gone without posting in here, and I’m pretty sure that gap will never be breached.

Now, be on the look-out for the part 2 of the series!

And of course, hit follow for new posts to get delivered straight to your inbox.

@Abhiminator

 

 

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